Adrienne Hernandez talks Fresh Art Foodie, eating clean, and coping with illness

From the carnivore to the vegan, the athlete to the couch surfer, Fresh Art Foodie has a menu sure to please the eye, palate, and soul. Fresh Art Foodie is a company dedicated to helping people eat clean and maintain health while consuming healthy food designed in artistic shapes. It was founded by Chef Adrienne Hernandez, who was inspired by her work in the medical field.

“When I graduated from Le Cordon Bleu, I went into healthcare,” Hernandez says. “I was working 80-90 hours in a nursing facility.”

Hernandez’s responsibilities included preparing meals for patients. While she enjoyed doing this, she felt that her creativity was limited, and eventually moved on to a catering position at Centennial Hospital. She worked as a Chef, moving up the ladder to Sous Chef and eventually to Executive Chef. She is also as a fitness coach and a wellness coach for Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University.

Hernandez was diagnosed with Lupus in her young adulthood and has used her experience to help others alleviate pain by eating healthy.

“Some of the food we eat mutates our bodies, so I try to help people get clean from the inside,” Hernandez said. “It’s hard, because I’m learning with my clients, but if you have Lupus or any other inflammatory disease, I try to help you fix that with food.”

Hernandez adds that her experience working in an Oncology department have helped her learn to create dishes to help subside the side effects of radiation and chemotherapy.

“If you have cancer or are going through radiation therapy, let’s sit down and talk about it,” Hernandez says. “There are certain vitamins that inhibit the chemotherapy’s ability to do what it’s supposed to do.”

Some of Chef Hernandez’s signature creations | Image courtesy of Adrienne Hernandez

With Fresh Art Foodie, Hernandez’s mobility allows her to work directly with clients, offering catering services, meal prep services, and even food challenges for team building activities in corporate or church environments. Hernandez caters to people of all diets and works with each client to meet their dietary needs. Some of her signature items include watermelon cakes, radish flowers, and healthy sushi rolls.

To book Chef Hernandez for your next event, visit freshartfoodie.com

 

First Look: Tulum in Highland Park

Photo credit: Shaban Athuman

From the masterminds behind Firebird Restaurant Group (El Fenix, Taqueria La Ventana) comes a new, luxury concept called Tulum.

Tulum was inspired by Firebird CEO Mike Karns’, and his wife, Valerie’s, travels to the namesake city in Mexico. It is the couple’s favorite vacation spot, and with Tulum, they hope to recreate the experience for guests of the restaurant. Tulum, the restaurant, encompasses many elements of Tulum, the city, and is an amalgamation of what people seek on their vacation; good food, relaxing atmosphere, and a temporary escape from the ordinary.

Atmosphere

Upon entering Tulum, guests are greeted with a flowing bar in the center of the entryway. Sounds of the Amazon rainforest are heard throughout the restaurant and images of the beaches and the waters are projected onto a large screen in the back of the main lounge. The music selection consists of jazz vocalists, electronic trance and house, and Latin sounds. Overall, the atmosphere and ambiance allow for a luxury, cultural experience.

Starters

Guests cannot find the typical chips and queso on Tulum’s starter menu. Instead, they are offered a diverse selection of land, sea, and even vegan plates. Among the starters are the chicken flutes, the vegan ceviche, and the charred Spanish octopus. The octopus comes served as a portion of an octopus tentacle sat atop an achiote ginger orange sauce, and with charred hearts of palm on the side. The outer skin of the tentacle is grilled to a crisp. The tentacle itself cuts like a steak, and is juicy, hearty, and flavorful.

Spanish charred octopus from Tulum (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

Mains

From a menu curated by Chef Nico Sanchez, guest can choose from a variety of minimalistically plated dishes. The diver scallops are an arrangement of three jumbo scallops sat atop a bed of mashed potatoes. They are served with a side of grilled beets and tamarind sauce. The scallops cut fairly easily and despite being a seemingly small portion, they are filling and satisfying.

Diver scallops from Tulum (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

Another good choice is the cheshire pork ribs, which are wood-burnt baby back ribs immersed in a chile Morita and served with a side of salsa negra and charred pineapple. The chile Morita makes the ribs spicy with each bite. When dipped in the salsa, the ribs become even spicier, however, a bite of the charred pineapple instantly cancels out the heat, making for an ideal symbiotic pairing of food.

Cheshire pork ribs from Tulum (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

Dessert

One of the desserts at Tulum is a chocolate sponge cake, which is served soaked in Nestle Chocolate Abuelita. It is a warm, comforting dessert that is not too heavy, yet makes for a delightful conclusion to a meal.

Chocolate Abuelita Cake from Tulum (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

Tulum is set to open its doors to the public on  Thursday, October 25 at 5:00 P.M.

Tulum, 4216 Oak Lawn Ave, Dallas (Highland Park) | thetulumexperience.com

Sixty Vines Uptown welcomes new Chef de Cuisine

Via @emerazphotography on Facebook

Award-winning wine concept Sixty Vines has recently named Ty Thaxton as their new Chef de Cuisine. Thaxton, who previously worked at The Keeper, came on board as Sixty Vines’s new Executive Chef late last month, following the departure of Stan Rodrigues. According to Thaxton, taking over the Sixty Vines team was a smooth process.

“It’s refreshing to be in such a well-oiled machine, and just run it a little bit tighter as well,” Thaxton says.

Thaxton’s restaurant industry resume boasts incredible feats, including experience as the Executive Chef at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Georgetown, Washington D.C. He hopes to use the knowledge he’s acquired in his almost two decades in the industry and apply that to cultivating success in Dallas’s growing food district.

“I hope to bring even more creativity and innovation,” Thaxton says. “Something that can keep Sixty Vines fresh and relevant in the area, but also, fall in line with our brand.”

Thaxton has traveled to various parts of the world, studying the cultures and crafts of various populations. He came to Dallas due to his and his wife’s desire to be closer to family. Upon moving to Dallas, he was hired in Plano at The Keeper, where he worked for almost a year until coming on board with Sixty Vines. As Thaxton has been part of Frontburner since he moved to Dallas, he was familiar with most of the Sixty Vines team before taking on his new role.

“I was actually involved in some of the hirings for this locationearly on, so it’s not like I’m starting from scratch with a bunch of strangers,” Thaxton says. “It’s very important to have that cohesiveness right off the bat, that way, we can just hit the ground running.”

As Sixty Vines’s new Chef de Cuisine, Thaxton hopes to continue to help Dallas’s restaurant scene grow and diversify.

“I like that Dallas is just now starting to dip its toes into food diversity,” Thaxton says. “You’ve always had these little ethnic pockets around town, but the selection is a lot more diverse now than it was 10 or 15 years ago. People are starting to open up their horizons more. For the longest time, our only options were Tex-Mex and steakhouses.”

As for the future of Sixty Vines, Thaxton is preparing his team for greatness as Frontburner expands its empire.

“We are planning on opening properties in other cities next year,” Thaxton says. “We want to make sure we have our techniques and processes down to a T here before we move forward.”

Sixty Vines is currently open in Plano and Uptown Dallas, with its next location slated for Houston in early 2019.

Sixty Vines, 500 Crescent Ct #160, Dallas, TX

 

 

Cowboys Fit to open in Plano early 2019

After having operated as a tent pole in The Star in Frisco for nearly a year, Cowboys Fit is set to open a new location in Plano, off of Preston and West Park Blvd. Cowboys Fit is a state-of-the-art gym facility offering members a comprehensive fitness experience with high-tech fitness equipment and luxury amenities.

Apart from rigorous training programs and the latest fitness equipment, Cowboys Fit also puts an emphasis on the recovery portion of the workout, offering amenities like cryogenic therapy and other treatments that can’t be found anywhere else.

The Cowboys Fit team of personal trainers consist of former NFL players, cheerleaders, and fitness experts across all disciplines, who will help you with a customized game plan to help you reach your fitness goals and make you feel like part of America’s team.

Cowboys Fit will open their new Plano location in early winter of 2019, right on time to bring in the new year with new fitness goals.

 

Cowboys Fit, 4817 W. Park Blvd., Plano, TX (Coming 2019)

Why Timothy Talbott Wants to Grow Dallas’s Film Industry

Those in pursuit of success in entertainment will often give up their last coin to move to a larger metropolis like Los Angeles or New York City. While this route is common, film director and Double T Productions founder Timothy Talbott believes that this is not the only way to go. A native Texan, born and raised, Talbott is determined to bring light to the landscapes and scenery that are often passed up or overlooked. Talbott also wants to put undiscovered talent under the spotlight.

I join Talbott at Ascension Coffee, located in the Design District, which is also home to fellow film director Johnathan Brownlee. We discuss a variety of topics, including how he came to develop an affinity for the film and entertainment industry.

“I don’t know if there was a moment where the inspiration just hit,” Talbott says. “It was really just a matter of things I enjoyed as a kid.”

Talbott then recalls how he was able to give his undivided attention to a television screen at any given moment during his youth.

“I’m an adventurer,” Talbott says. “My mom used to tell people that if you put me in a room, you better keep an eye on me, unless you turn on the TV, then I’d just sit down and start watching.”

As a child, Talbott’s love for the arts was unmatched, compared to that of his friends.

“Even though I love sports, watching TV and film was way more fun to me,” Talbott says. “Movies and television programs are like puzzles; you put this big thing together and it’s different every time. A football game is a football game. You get four quarters, things happen, but rarely is it that exciting. Take the Super Bowl for instance. If your team isn’t in it, how involved are you?”

Although Talbott tends to favor art and entertainment over sports, he is fond of professional wrestling and even had a stint as a wrestler in National Wrestling Alliance’s Southwest Division in the late 90s.

“I wanted to get into wrestling because it’s live-action storytelling,” Talbott said. “I knew that if I could get into wrestling I could get into acting.”

Talbott later moved to Los Angeles, where he would live for ten years before eventually deciding to return home to Texas, where he would produce his first feature film.

“That was really a defining moment,” Talbott says. “After ten years in L.A. just grunting it out and trying to get by, I move back to Texas, and within a year to the day, I’m beginning principal photography on The Demon Inside. We filmed that movie in Denton over the course of two weeks.”

Talbott produced and acted his first feature film, The Demon Inside, in Denton. Filming took place over the course of two weeks (Photo courtesy of Double T Productions)

After his work on The Demon Inside, Talbott believes that talent in Dallas’ film scene is just as remarkable of larger art-centered cities.

“When my L.A. friends want to shoot a movie, I tell them, ‘we’re going to shoot the movie in Texas, and we’re gonna use Texas crew and Texas actors,’” Talbott says. “The problem is, I’m a small brand and I definitely want to grow. I question why we don’t have a film industry equal to or better than that of anywhere else.”

Talbott strives to bring Texas filmmakers together (Photo courtesy of Double T Productions)

Talbott also expresses frustration with filmmakers setting their works in Dallas, yet filming them in other locations.

“You’ve got a movie like Dallas Buyers Club,” Talbott says. “You’ve got Matt McConaughey sitting on his car, and the Dallas skyline is in the background. Filmed in Louisiana. Part of that takes away from Dallas. “As far as Dallas goes, there’s more to it than just Dallas. It’s Texas as a whole. L.A. is L.A. They have six major studios there. They have acres and acres of studio lots. Here in Dallas, you can drive an hour in any direction and you have different landscapes. You have space. We have weather. ”

Having worked on multiple projects in Dallas, including hit Hulu series “11.23.63” and his upcoming thriller film, Trunkfish, Talbott can attest to the fact that Dallas’s art scene is on the rise.

Talbott’s film Trunkfish is set for release later this year (Photo courtesy of Double T productions)

“Texas is growing and there are a lot of areas that are getting rejuvenated,” Talbott says. “Things are changing, and hopefully, part of that is keeping productions here. I’ve seen the old, and maybe it’s time to come into the new. Nobody is going to take down Hollywood. Hollywood is Hollywood. But I don’t see why Texas can’t have its own film industry on par with everyone else.”

 

 

Jack Mason Celebrates Five Years in Business

As the age-old saying holds, time is money, and the men behind Jack Mason are on a mission to make their customers look like a million bucks. Since best friends Craig Carter and Michael Reese launched Jack Mason, the pair have become a strong force in the accessories game. They have partnered with a variety of high-end retailers, including Dillard’s, Jared, Saks Fifth Avenue,  Bloomingdales, and Nordstrom.

“Nordstrom was our first customer,” Carter says. “That was the biggest goal we had set out; having a brand, saving it, and taking it to Nordstrom. Having been in the watch industry for so many years, we just knew there was a need for a new type of watch among all of the brands available.”

By the time Carter and Reese had presented their designs and inventions to Nordstrom, the pair had a combined 25 years of retail and wholesale experience, having developed an affinity and knowledge of timepieces throughout the years.

“Mike and I first met here in Dallas,” Carter says. “We were working for the same company when we first moved here. He actually stayed at that same company for a few years and I went off to work for other companies in retail/sales environments.”

Craig Carter (left) and Michael Reese (right) launched Jack Mason in 2013. (Photo courtesy of Jack Mason)

Carter and Reese were later reunited at a different watch company, where they eventually came to the conclusion that they wanted to create products of their own.

“We wanted to be a true lifestyle brand,” Carter says. “We wanted to create something that we saw a need for in the market.”

The pair launched Jack Mason in 2013 and their products were immediately well-received.

“When we went to do a presentation for Nordstrom in Seattle, that was kind of the defining moment for us,” Carter says. “We made it into the jewelry section of Nordstrom, as well as the men’s’ section, so we were double exposed. Not a lot of brands have this to their credit.”

When choosing where to set up their headquarters, Carter and Reese wanted to be in an area that had a familial, community-oriented feel.

“We had originally set up shop in the West End, which is a great area, but we couldn’t really do everything we wanted to do,” Carter says. “When we got our first office where we could ship and receive product, we were actually in the Design District. But the Design District is just so big and Deep Ellum just has more of a community type feel to it.”

The pair finally decided to set up shop in Deep Ellum, among various local brands.

“It’s cool because a lot of companies are moving down to Deep Ellum and Deep Ellum has such a rich history to it,” Carter says. “You’ve got a lot of cool local barbers, tattoo artists, and restaurants opening up. We really just love that sense of community.”

Apart from crafting innovative, technologically advanced wrist pieces, Carter is also passionate about maintaining his individuality within his personal aesthetic.

“My style is different from Michael’s,” Carter says.  “Michael’s going wear his Stetson hat every day, because that’s just his style. For me, I follow a lot of influencers on social media, so if I see something I like, I try to emulate it as best as I can. But I don’t really go for one certain brand, I take multiple brands, throw them together, and create a look I want. If you ask Michael, he’ll tell you that he’s always going to shop at J. Crew. Me, I may go to J. Crew, but I’ll also go to other stores to put an outfit together.”

While Carter’s looks are inspired by a multitude of brands, he certainly never leaves home without his Jack Mason Diver watch.

“The Diver Watch is a very versatile watch,” Carter says. “You can wear it out to dinner, or you can put a rubber strap on it and go diving. It’s 30 ATM, so you can go about 1000 feet underwater while wearing it.”

The Diver Watch is one of the most versatile timepieces in the Jack Mason collection. (Photo courtesy of Jack Mason)

Jack Mason’s Diver Watch is just one of many designs crafted by the hands of Carter and Reese.

This December, Jack Mason will be launching their Regatta Timer watch.

“We did a Kickstarter for our Regatta Timer,” Carter says, “This is our first Swiss movement watch and it’s creation was completely backed by those who donated to our Kickstarter.”

Jack Mason’s Regatta Timer watch is set to launch this coming December (Via Kickstarter).

The men of Jack Mason are truly innovators in the accessories game. They have created products to fit everyone’s lifestyle, aesthetic, and price point.

“All of our watches are very approachable, given the quality of them,” Carter says. “They’re priced in a way that everyone can afford them, so that’s what sets us apart from everyone else.”

Tight Quarters is Now Open in Legacy Hall

From the man behind Dallas barbeque staple Smoke comes a brand new Asian-inspired concept. Having become a household name in the realm of meats, Chef Tim Byres makes a 180 degree turn with new, nutritious and filling options. At Tight Quarters, Legacy Hall’s newest food booth, guests can choose from a variety of Asian Inspired power bowls, filled with flavorful meats, fresh veggies, and an abundance of spices.

The Steak Pad Thai noodle bowl is one of the many great bowls available for purchase at Tight Quarters. The noodles-to-fillings ratio is just right, and the customer certainly gets their money’s worth on meat and fresh vegetables.

Apart from bowls, Tight Quarters will soon be offering homemade kombucha and Mother of Vinegar Shrub Drinks.

Tight Quarters is now open in Legacy Hall in Plano. For more information on hours and menu options, visit eattq.com

Weekend Happenings 7/27 – 7/29: Mumm Champagne Dinner, Stars, Stripes and Summer Nights, and more.

Truluck’s presents Mumm Champagne Dinner

7/27 at 7:00 p.m.

Truluck’s Seafood Steak & Crab House

Truluck’s will present a four-course champagne dinner. Savor signature fresh seafood dishes and house-made desserts, sumptuously paired with an array of Champagne selections from the centuries-long Maison Mumm dynasty. For tickets click here.

Photo courtesy of Truluck’s

 

Scardello Artisan Cheese presents French Wine and Cheese

7/27 at 8:00 p.m.

Scardello Artisan Cheese

 

Scardello Artisan Cheese will explore 1,000 cheeses paired with fantastic wines from several of the best wine regions of France. Experience true cheese bliss, or as they say in France, “Joie de Vivre!” Tickets can be bought at the door or purchased here.

Photo courtesy of Scardello Artisan Cheese

 

Lone Star Ranch and Rescue presents Horse-a-Palooza

7/28 at 5:30 p.m.

Tupps Brewery

 

Lone Star Ranch and Rescue will present Horse-a-Palooza, featuring great food, craft beers, and music from Red Leather. The evening will raise money to rescue, rehab, and rehome some horses. Tickets can be purchased here.

Photo courtesy of Lone Star Ranch & Rescue

 

2018 Dallas Hip-Hop Dance Festival

7/28 at 7:00 p.m.

Majestic Theater

 

Dallas Hip-Hop Dance Festival is the largest hip-hop dance festival in the south, featuring dancers of all ages and representing all forms of hip-hop dance. DHDF will host three unique events during the festival: Convention, Battle, and The Show. Tickets can be purchased here.

Photo by Sean Malone

 

The Rustic presents Stars Stripes and Summer Nights

7/29 at 4:00 p.m.

The Rustic

 

The Rustic will present an afternoon of live music and everyone’s favorite summer indulgences, all while supporting Folds of Honor. Standout local blues and soul powerhouse Abraham Alexander will kick off the event with live music. Luke Pell, U.S. Army Captain turned country music heartthrob after starring on The Bachelorette, will take the stage next. Catch Pell performing his chart-topping hit, “Ball Caps” and “Blue Jeans.” The live music doesn’t stop there. One of Texas country’s finest, Wade Bowen, will cap off the night with a high energy, full band performance, and with Bowen, you never know who might join him on stage. One hundred percent of the proceeds from ticket sales and a percentage of the proceeds from the vendors will benefit Folds of Honor, an organization that provides educational scholarships to spouses and children of America’s fallen and disabled service members. Tickets can be purchased here.

Via Facebook

 

Kent Rathbun Opens Imoto in Victory Park

While it may be crowded on game nights and during concerts, Victory Park is one of Dallas’s less-frequented neighborhoods. Although the district houses the American Airlines Center, a WFAA news station, and Happiest Hour bar, the action in Victory Park is relatively low compared to that of Dallas’s other neighborhoods. A few restaurant owners, including Kent Rathbun, owner of Imoto, are hoping to help boost the nightlife action over in Victory Park.

Imoto, a sushi and pan-Asian restaurant, was the first of several restaurants to open in Victory Park, over a year after a revamp of the neighborhood was proposed.

It is Imoto’s sixth day in business at the time of this interview, and so far, Rathbun feels that opening Imoto in Victory Park was a good investment made.

“The people revamping this entire Victory Park district approached us and asked if we’d want to open a restaurant down here,” Rathbun says.  “At first, we were a little bit reluctant about opening here, but the more we heard about what was happening and what was coming and seeing who was signing, we decided that this is where we want to be.”

Rathbun describes the first few days of operation as “eerily phenomenal.”

“I’m not even talking about the size of the crowds, or about the money we’ve pulled in,” Rathbun says, “I’m talking about the performance of our staff, the performance of our kitchen, and the response from our guests.”

Imoto serves top-notch Pan-Asian food (via Facebook)

Rathburn then emphasizes the importance of starting slow and gradually picking up the pace.

“Right now, it’s not about being packed to the brim, it’s not about bringing in a huge amount of revenue,” Rathbun says, “it’s about creating an environment that everyone likes and in which everyone feels comfortable. I don’t care how good of a restaurant you are; if you start off at 100 miles per hour, you’re going to fall on your face.”

This philosophy can also be tied back to the process of creating and opening the restaurant. It took Rathbun nearly two decades to achieve his desired aesthetic and atmosphere.

“When I first was researching concepts for another restaurant of mine, Abacus, back in 1998, I went to a restaurant called Buddha Bar in Paris, France,” Rathbun says. “It was a restaurant that featured sushi and pan-Asian food. The cool thing about this restaurant is that it had a vibe I would never forget. Ever since, I’ve been trying to recreate that vibe. Abacus came very close, but Abacus was more world cuisine.”

Rathbun, having worked exclusively in the hospitality industry since the young age of 14, can attest to this fact. Despite not having trained in a culinary arts program, he considers himself very to have learned under the mentors he worked with in the early beginnings of his career.

“I have no formal degree in culinary arts,” Rathbun says. “I am sort of just a product of working in really good restaurants with really good chefs. I don’t use the term ‘self-trained’ specifically because I’m not self-trained. I’ve been fortunate to work with fantastic chefs in fantastic restaurants and just pay attention.”

Peking Duck Spring Rolls from Imoto (Via Facebook)

Despite taking immense pride in his work, Rathbun still has his eyes set on the bigger picture.

“Obviously, we want to be successful, but the real bottom line is to be part of bringing this district back to life,” Rathbun says. “If that happens, everyone wins. We’re just a piece of the puzzle here. But if that piece of the puzzle fits and that puzzle eventually turns out to be one of the hottest districts in Dallas, which I think it will be, then we’ve done our job.”

Imoto is currently open for dinner in Victory Park. For information on menu items, hours, and specials, visit imotodallas.com

 

 

 

 

Weekend Happenings 7/13 – 7/15: World Cup Final, Wine & Magic, and more

Dallas Farmers Market presents Karaoke Night

Dallas Farmers Market will present a Friday Night Block Party. Warm up your vocal cords & join DJ Robert-O for a night of vocal self-expression & listening fun. Food and drink available at The Market. The event is free to attend and kicks off at 6:00 P.M.

Photo by Kevin Marple



Bastille on Bishop

Bastille on Bishop is an annual festival in the heart of the Bishop Arts District that celebrates Oak Cliff’s unique French roots.​ Visitors can don their best berets and join friends for a little champagne and dancing in the streets. To consume alcoholic beverages at the festival, guests must have one of the event wine glasses. Glasses comes with two tokens, which can be redeemed for either beverages or food. Cocktails, beer, and wine require one token. Most food requires one token as well. The only people who need a ticket are those who plan to consume alcohol. The festival is free for those who are simply coming to enjoy the atmosphere. Additional tokens for food and drink will be available at the event at $6 per token. Tickets can be purchased here.

Photo by Elliot Muñoz

 

 

Barbecue Bus – Fort Worth

The BBQ Bus is hitting Fort Worth for the first time on Saturday from 1p-5p. Guests will meet up at HopFusion Ale Works and head out to Billy’s Oak Acres, Cousin’s Bar-B-Q and Riscky’s Barbeque. At each location, we will enjoy a plate of brisket, ribs, and sausage! Plus the beer is stocked with craft brews from Hopfusion! Tickets can be purchased here.

Photo courtesy of RVC Promotions

 

Checkered Past Winery presents Wine and Magic

Checkered Past Winery will host award-winning magician Trigg Watson for Wine and Magic. Signature wines, pizza, charcuterie, desserts, and more will be available for purchase during the intimate show. Watson first fell in love with magic in his native Australia and later honed his craft while living in New Orleans. Watson has called Dallas home ever since attending and graduating from Southern Methodist University. He has since performed on several national television shows and won multiple awards. Tickets can be purchased here.

Photo courtesy of Trigg Watson

 

World Cup Final Watch Party at Legacy Hall

Watch France and Croatia go head to head at The Box Garden at Legacy Hall for the official North Dallas Summer of Soccer FINAL Watch Party this Sunday at 10 a.m. They are teaming up with FC Dallas for a celebration that will include: FIFA PlayStation gaming, the FC Drumline, player appearances, swag and more! The event is free to attend.

Via Plano Magazine