Weekend Happenings 6/29 -7/1: Deep Ellum Distillery, live music, and more

Mason Lively & Remy Reilly in the Box Garden at Legacy Hall

Enjoy blues, rock, and Americana? Be sure to catch Mason Lively at The Box Garden for a free musical performance. Plus, see why everyone is calling Remy Reilly the next big thing. At just age 14, she has written and released a solo EP and performed in various venues across Texas. The show kicks of at 7:00 p.m. tonight. Check out Remy Reilly’s self-titled EP below.

Deep Ellum Distillery Opening

Deep Ellum Distillery opens at 3:00 p.m. today. Swing by their grand opening party and try a wide selection of vodkas infused with seasonal fruits. Plus, try one or all of their five signature cocktails, including the Route 66. Mixed drinks will all be sold at $2.00 off! Deep Ellum Distillery is located at 2817 Canton St.

Route 66 from Deep Ellum Distillery (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

Donuts + Beer Pairing

This Saturday, Oak Highlands Brewery will be partnering with Hypnotic Donuts for a pairing event. The pairings include Charity German Alt-Style Ale paired with Vanilla Cake donut topped with a Cookie Butter Glaze and Sweet Potato Cheesecake, and more. Tickets can be purchased for $20 here. 

 

Photo courtesy of Do214

 

African Film Festival

The African Film Festival will feature storytelling, film screenings, acting workshops, symposium, and an Awards Gala night. The festival will showcase one-of-a-kind African independent films that either promote African culture; address issues affecting Africa; or explore African landmarks and historic leaders. Festival attendees will be treated to an exploration of the African continent through the global lens and voices of talented filmmakers, producers and talent artist. The festival will prominently feature African creatives and will also be an opportunity to spotlight other filmmakers’ take on African cultures and experiences. Therefore, providing a rich and varied experience for attendees.Events on June 29-July 1 will be at the African American Museum, events on July 2 will be at SMU, and events on July 3 will be at Moody Performance Hall. Tickets can be purchased here.

Photo Courtesy of Trendy Africa

Happy Goat Yoga at Lava Cantina

This Sunday, Lava Cantina will be hosting a goat yoga session. Goat yoga is the trendiest activity at the moment, and proceeds from ticket sales will go to Here’s Your Reminder, a charity committed to inspiring kindness and combatting depression. Tickets for Happy Goat Yoga can be purchased here.

Photo courtesy of Wide Open Pets

 

“It’s not about what you have, it’s about what you give away:” Joe Pacetti on giving back to the community

To whom much is given, much is expected, as the age-old saying holds. While some people prefer to use their earnings to live a lavish lifestyle, others prefer to use their privilege to help others. Such is the case for Joe Pacetti, owner of J. Pacetti Precious Jewels, one of Dallas’s best-kept secrets. With the earnings he has acquired throughout his decades in the jewelry business, Pacetti has been a long-time supporter of multiple charities across the world.

I speak with Pacetti in his appointment-exclusive store on a Friday afternoon, a day before the annual DIFFA fashion show. Pacetti has been a long-time supporter of Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS.

“I was asked about 26 years ago to get involved with DIFFA,” Pacetti says. “I was approached to design a jacket. That was back when Levi Strauss was giving us the blue jean denim jackets. Back then, you could get a denim jacket for 200 or 300 dollars, and that was considered a bargain.”

Although DIFFA is a nationally renowned charity, Dallas’s chapter holds a special place in Pacetti’s heart.

“The Dallas chapter has always been the most prolific, in terms of raising money,” Pacetti says. “I’ve been playing the same role I’ve played all along. I’ve just been a supporter. I’ve sat on the board for many years, but my job doesn’t allow me the opportunity to attend board meetings. It’s easier for me to write a check than it is for me to attend all the board meetings.”

Photo courtesy of Joe Pacetti

Every year, Pacetti makes a contribution towards DIFFA, one of the many charities he has outspokenly supported over the years.

As someone who built himself from the ground up, Pacetti is a proprietor who truly understands the value of hard work.

“I’ve always loved jewelry,” Pacetti says. “I grew up in a family where we didn’t have jewelry, but I’ve always admired it. My first job was in a barbershop as a shoeshine boy at age 13. When I would get paid, I would spend my earnings on jewelry for myself.”

Pacetti continued to work hard and over the years, purchased more jewelry for himself.

“By the time I was 16, I was a waiter, and I bought myself my first gold and diamond watch from Omega,” Pacetti says.

Pacetti’s affinity to jewelry continued to flourish into his young adulthood.

“I dated a girl whose family was quite privileged,” Pacetti says.  “The mother always wore nice jewelry and I would compliment her on it. One time, she told me ‘you’re majoring in marketing, and you should be selling jewelry once you finish college.’”

At the time, Pacetti wasn’t sure if this was the path he wanted to follow. He had always had an admiration for jewelry, however, he didn’t know much in regards to the science behind precious jewels. He took courses in Gemology at the suggestion of his then-girlfriend’s mother. He later went on to receive his associate’s degree from a junior college in Tulsa. He later went on to pursue a career in jewelry sales.

Photo courtesy of Joe Pacetti

“I went to Dallas from my hometown of Tulsa,” Pacetti says. “I met with a man named Leo Fields, who was the senior VP of Zales. He hired me to run the store in Tulsa. I worked there for two years and I made a record sale. The average sale was $800 and I made a $43,000 sale for them in 1979.”

Despite this record sale, Pacetti did not receive any form of additional compensation, resulting in his frustration.

When I asked for a commision, my superior told me that that wasn’t in their pay structure,” Pacetti says. “I said if I didn’t get something, I was going to leave. He told me he was sorry to hear that. Then I left, with my little green plastic box of contacts, and no money.”

While this may seem like a risky move, Pacetti was confident in the process. He used the contacts he had acquired during his time at Zales and began to develop a sales strategy.

“I called about six vendors that we dealt with and told them ‘I’m the one who sold you your aquamarine ring’ or ‘I’m the one who sold you your emerald earrings,” Pacetti says. I’d ask ‘Would you send me one or two pieces on consignment to work with? If I sell it, I’ll pay you, but if I don’t, I’ll send them back.’”

At 22, Pacetti had launched his own jewelry business, however, his decades in the game have not come without challenge.

“Having an inventory of jewelry is a lot more difficult to have than seeds for plants,” Pacetti says. “I don’t know what to compare it to, but it can add up very quickly. I didn’t have parents who could fund me and I didn’t have an inheritance to fall back on. I had to prove myself in the business. I had to prove that I was reliable, capable, and responsible.”

Photo courtesy of Joe Pacetti

Pacetti has since proven himself, having served a wide variety of clientele with specific wants and needs.

“I have a different type of clientele,” Pacetti says. “Most of my clientele are people that want jewelry. They don’t necessarily buy it for anniversaries or birthdays.”

While Pacetti has grown a financially privileged customer base, he still believes in the moral obligation of using what he’s earned to help others.

“I’m a big supporter of my church, Cathedral of Hope,” Pacetti says. “I also support The Resource Center of Dallas. Part of our obligation in life is to give to others. I’m really happy to give to various organizations and I am blessed to be able to have the resources to help others.”

Pacetti, understanding that not everyone has the resources he has afforded, reinforces that people don’t have to give money or material things for their contributions to be worthwhile.

“Giving doesn’t have to involve money,” Pacetti says.  “You can give your time, and you can give your knowledge. It’s not about what you have, it’s about what you give away.”

Even given his hard-earned possessions, home, and lifestyle, Pacetti never strays away from the values that made him who he is today.

“I probably couldn’t live without a cross,” Pacetti says. “I’ve worn crosses since my early teens. When I see the cross, it reminds me of what life’s all about.”

 

Weekend Happenings 6/22 – 6/24: Reunion Lawn Party, Ultimate Dinosaurs, and more

Dive-In Movies at Hawaiian Falls

Hawaiian Falls Waterpark has kicked off its summer movie series across all four of its North Texas locations. Tonight at 8:30, families can catch a screening of “Wonder,” while floating in the wave pool at Hawaiian Falls’s Roanoke location.

Photo Courtesy of Hawaiian Falls

Taste of Dallas 2018 at Gas Monkey Live

For the tens of thousands of people set to visit Taste of Dallas this year, there will be something for everyone at Dallas’ largest summertime food festival. Attendees will be able to engage and interact with over 150 sponsors and exhibitors in both indoor and outdoor settings throughout the weekend. Featured attraction areas include Taste’s Restaurant Showcase, Backyard Bites, Taste Curbside, South of the Border, Taste Marketplace, the Family Fun Zone, as well as dozens of fun and interactive sponsor activations. Tickets can be purchased at your local Walgreen’s store for the discounted price of $14, otherwise, they can be purchased here.

Via Facebook

Nemo’s Grand Opening

This Saturday, Nemo’s Salads, Soups, and More will be celebrating its grand opening. Guests can choose from a “build-your-own” style menu and have their proteins, toppings, and sauces served in the form of a sub, panini, wrap, or salad. Everyone who comes in on Saturday will be entered in a raffle. 10 winners will win a free t-shirt and one winner will win free entrees for a year. Nemo’s is located in Plano, TX at 1921 W 15th Street.

Via Facebook

Dallas Summer Musicals Presents The Lion King

The Lion King is on its second week at Music Hall at Fair Park. There are plenty of tickets available for this spectacular, visually stunning musical. Tickets and showtimes can be found here.

Photo credit: Joan Marcus

Reunion Lawn Party

This Saturday, Dallasites can gather together for a lawn party celebrating one of Dallas’s most well-known landmarks. At the Reunion Lawn Party, attendees can grab bites from 10 different food trucks, Dallas’s newest dessert bar Baldo’s Ice Cream, and entertainment from Limelight Band. The party kicks off tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. and admission is free to attend.

Via Facebook

Perot Museum presents “Ultimate Dinosaurs”

“Ultimate Dinosaurs” is a showcase revealing a new breed of dinosaurs that evolved in isolation in South America, Africa, and Madagascar. It tells the story of the break-up of supercontinent Pangaea into today’s continents and the ways that continental drift affected the evolution of dinosaurs. “Ultimate Dinosaurs” will be taking place all weekend, and tickets can be purchased here.

Photo courtesy of Perot Museum

25 Years of Chamberlain’s: How Jeff Barker Came to Operate Two of Dallas’s Top Restaurants

Behind every great restaurant is a team of diligent, hard workers. When selecting people to work in Chamberlain’s Steak and Chop House or Chamberlain’s Fish Market, owner Richard Chamberlain picks people with track records of providing quality service and showing personability through all stages of their career. Given the criteria Chamberlain uses when building his team, it is no surprise that he chose Jeff Barker to partner with him in the opening of his restaurants.

Jeff Barker is the Director of Operations for both of Chamberlain’s restaurants. He has been working in the industry since before his teenage years.

“My father passed away when I was 11 years old,” Barker says. “I grew up an only child. My mother was struggling to work, so when I wanted to buy myself a pair of sneakers or just anything for myself, I felt it was my responsibility to pitch in.”

After experiencing such a tragic loss, Barker began to search for a job as a means to make money to support himself and his mother.

“Shortly after my dad’s passing, I saw an advertisement in a paper for a restaurant that was hiring a dishwasher and busboy,” Barker says. “I got the job and I fell in love with this industry. I began working when I was 12 and I’ve been in this industry ever since.”

Barker’s first job in the hospitality industry was at a restaurant called Lock, Stock & Barrel. He later went on to work at a restaurant called The Randy Tar.

“I stayed at The Randy Tar for almost nine years,” Barker says. “I worked my way through college there.”

Barker graduated from University of North Texas in 1981 with a General Business degree.

“After I graduated college, I applied for several jobs in the restaurant business, each of which required a degree,” Barker says.  “I received offers from all of the jobs I applied for.”

Upon receipt of these offers, Barker felt motivated to launch a company of his own.

“I figured, ‘if I’m good enough to work for all of these places, I should just open up my own business,'” Barker says.

Barker then launched a catering company, which proved to be a success. He worked with his catering company until he received an offer he couldn’t refuse; A management position at Dakota’s Steakhouse, under Lincoln Properties.

“I was a multi-unit supervisor at Dakota’s,” Barker says. “I oversaw both the front and back of the house.”

Barker also had a run as a sous chef at Harvey Hotels when they were first opening in Dallas, until he and Richard Chamberlain eventually teamed up to open Chamberlain’s Steak and Chop House. The pair also opened Chamberlain’s Fish Market in 2001, which currently holds the number one spot for seafood restaurants in the metroplex on TripAdvisor.

Richard Chamberlain (left) and Jeff Barker partnered to open Chamberlain’s Steak and Chop House and Chamberlain’s Fish Market in Addison (Photo Credit: Alex Gonzalez)

Having worked in this industry since his pre-teen days, Barker has developed a code that he recommends people follow if they are wanting lifelong careers in the hospitality industry.

“You have to have an outgoing personality,” Barker says. “It’s key to just be friendly to everyone. It’s also helpful to have a good memory and eliminate any gray areas in your work. You’ve got to be a person of your word.”

Chamberlain’s Fish Market is the number one seafood restaurant in the DFW Metroplex, according to TripAdvisor (Via Facebook)

Apart from handling the operations at both of Chamberlain’s restaurants, Barker has also previously served as President of the Greater Dallas Restaurant Association.

“During my time on the restaurant board, we were able to make a change on the way taxes are handled on mixed beverages in restaurants,” Barker says. “This was about 25 years in the making, but ultimately, we were able to help restaurants save a ton of money.”

Barker strongly believes that his decades of working in the hospitality industry aligns with the American dream.

“I started out as a busboy and a dishwasher, and now I operate two restaurants,” Barker says. “The hospitality industry is one where you can come in with no experience, starting from the very bottom, and eventually grow to run your own place.”

Weekend Happenings: Father’s Day Brunches and Dinners

Fearing’s Restaurant

Chef Dean Fearing and crew will be hosting a “You’re the Man” themed backyard barbecue at his Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Fearing’s will offer three-course brunch and dinner meals, including Alaskan King Crab with citrus-poached jumbo prawn, a backyard barbecue plate with brisket and elk sausage, and more. Brunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and dinner will be served from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. To make a reservation, click here or call (214)-922-4848.

Make your way over to Fearing’s this Sunday for some down-south fun (Via Facebook)

Table 13

Typically closed on Sundays, Table 13 will be opening up on Father’s Day for dinner from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. For $45, guests and their fathers can feast upon a delicious selection of steak and seafood. To make a reservation, click here or call (972)-789-9558.

Table 13 will be open this Sunday for dinner (Via Facebook)

Bulla Gastrobar

On Father’s Day, guests of Legacy West’s Bulla can try many of the gastrobar’s delicious authentic tapas. Plus, they will be giving free orders of their delectable churros to fathers who are able to solve the Bulla Brainteaser. To make a reservation, click here or call (972)-805-4590.

Bulla Gastrobar offers a great selection of authentic Spanish tapas (via Facebook)

Maggiano’s Little Italy

Maggiano’s Northpark location will be putting a spin on the traditional Italian Father’s Day brunch. This Sunday, the famed Italian restaurant will be hosting a murder mystery party from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets for the murder mystery party start at $65 and include three courses and non-alcoholic beverages. For tickets, click here.

Maggiano’s Little Italy will be hosting a Murder Mystery Dinner Party this Sunday (Via Facebook)

V-Eats

Old man not big on meat? V-Eats at Trinity Groves will be hosting a vegan brunch this Sunday. Guests meat-and-dairy-less versions of traditional southern brunch items prepared by chef Troy Gardner. Brunch begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. To make a reservation, click here or call (214)-377-6009.

Bananas Foster from V-Eats (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

 

Boss Women Who Brunch to host women empowerment brunch at Gather Kitchen

As women continue to thrive in what had once been known as male-dominated fields, the female empowerment wave keeps growing and growing. The Dallas-based Boss Women Who Brunch is an organization committed to helping corporate, millennial women cultivate their dream careers by providing tips and tools from professionals and
encouraging the community to participate.

On Saturday, June 23, Gather Kitchen will be hosting “Corporate Women Unite: How to 9 and Thrive in Corporate,” a brunch event for corporate, millennial, and professional women.

Photo courtesy of Kali Ah Yuen at People’s Revolt

“Corporate women often feel isolated with little information available to help them move from
one position to the next,” BWWB founder Marty McDonald says.“The event allows these women to network with the local community, while highlighting and gathering insight, in-person, from notable panelists who will share advice and provide actionable tools onhow to achieve their career goals.”

The event will help initiate and maintain unity among corporate women in the DFW metroplex and beyond through key speakers and icebreaker features. Key speakers at the event include CEO and President of Women’s Foodservice Forum, Hattie Hill, former President of Del Frisco’s Grille and C-Level Executive, Sarah McAloon, Senior Brand Manager at Sally’s Beauty, Mia Lawrence and more.

Corporate Women Unite will take place on Saturday, June 23 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For tickets and a full list of keynote speakers, click here.

 

25 Years of Chamberlain’s: Richard Chamberlain’s Journey to Creating One of Dallas’s Top Steakhouses

Since its opening in 1993, Chamberlain’s Steak and Chop House has received much acclaim from food critics and connoisseurs alike. It has been hailed as Dallas’s Best Steakhouse by various publications, including Texas Monthly, D Magazine, and Trip Advisor. Richard Chamberlain, a native Texan, has undeniably earned such accolades, and even after 25 years in business, he remains humble.

“I like to say that every part of your career that helps you build and learn is a very important part of your career,” Chamberlain says.

Like Chris Vogeli, the executive chef at III Forks, Chamberlain studied at El Centro College in their Culinary Arts department.

“El Centro was great,” Chamberlain says. “I learned a lot about the restaurant business, like food costs and labor costs. Gus Katsigris, the person in charge of the culinary department would say ‘this is how a Greek god runs a restaurant’ and he taught us really efficient cooking techniques.

Chamberlain cites his experience studying at El Centro as a key factor that helped him get a job as a grillier at The Mansion on Turtle Creek.

Fun Fact: Richard Chamberlain worked at The Mansion on Turtle Creek as a grillier while Dean Fearing was working there as a saucier! (Photo credit: Alex Gonzalez)

“One day,  during my apprenticeship at The Mansion, the sous chef comes in with a giant bowl of garlic,” Chamberlain says, “and he tells me ‘I need you to chop this.’ And then, I’m thinking, ‘well okay, this is going to take a while.’ As they taught me in culinary school, I pull out a piece of garlic and I smash it with the side of my knife and then I dice it.”

Chamberlain then quickly learned that working in a high-end restaurant would require that he pick up on modern, more efficient techniques.

“A short while later, Chef comes back and yells ‘What are you doing?!’” Chamberlain says. “Regarding my technique, he says ‘that’s how we did it 40 years ago,’ then he throws the rest of the bowl into a big food processor and he chops the garlic in about five seconds. Of course, I was embarrassed. There were about 20 other chefs in the kitchen. But this was just one of the parts of learning efficient and very high standards of cooking in French kitchens like The Mansion.”

Before his apprenticeship at The Mansion, Chamberlain worked at Dallas’s Trail Dust Steakhouse, where he was one of three grill cooks in a nearly 400-seat restaurant. Prior to opening Chamberlain’s, he held many other restaurant jobs in various parts of the country. During that time, Chamberlain pioneered a form of culinary arts called American Alpine Cooking.

“American Alpine Cooking is a cuisine I created while I was a chef in Aspen at a hotel called The Little Nell Hotel,” Chamberlain says, “The alpine cooking was me taking the best that the mountainous regions had to offer and putting them into creative dishes.”

Chamberlain spent three years working in Aspen, then another two working in Los Angeles’s Bel Air Hotel, until he eventually decided to return home to Dallas.

“I came back here with the intention of opening a restaurant,” Chamberlain says. “I’m a fifth-generation Texan. I come from a family of cattle ranchers. Opening a steakhouse came naturally to me.”

In 1993, Chamberlain opened Chamberlain’s Steak and Chop House. Since then, it has been hailed as one of Dallas’s best steakhouses. But with owning a great restaurant comes the great obligation of providing the best service.

One of Chamberlain’s steak items (Via Facebook)

“We have to hire the very best we can find,” Chamberlain says, “not just experience-wise, but we largely hire based on attitude and personality.”

Chamberlain is also very selective in the ways he and his team source ingredients for his dishes.

“In all the regions I’ve cooked in, including Dallas, I’ve always tried to focus on local ingredients,” Chamberlain says. “But for Dallas, it’s a little more challenging, since Texas has very short seasons.”

Despite Texas’s short seasons, Chamberlain still tries to source as locally as possible. For example, the wagyu beef he uses comes from Oklahoma A Bar N Ranch, which is about an hour north of Dallas. Although Chamberlain sources his fish from all over the United States, the redfish he uses is raised on the Texas Coast.

Richard Chamberlain adding the finishing touches to one of his signature dishes (Via Facebook)

Apart from owning one of Dallas’s best restaurants, Chamberlain is also involved in various local charities.

My primary charity is the American Heart Association,” Chamberlain says. “I’ve been involved with them for a little over 20 years. Our annual event is Cote du Coeur, and this year, we raised a record of $4.8 million this year. All of it goes to heart research and education.”

Before concluding our interview and getting ready for a dinner shift, Chamberlain notes that anyone wanting to open their own restaurant be up to the challenge, and not to let any challenge defeat them.

“Anything that’ll help you build your resume is something you should consider, no matter how difficult it may seem,” Chamberlain says. “I don’t know of any failures I encountered, but there were many challenges along my way here.”

 

 

Weekend Happenings 6/8 – 6/10: Eggfest, Tough MUTTer, and more

Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest

Best of Guide is a proud sponsor of Sunnyland Outdoor Furniture’s Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest. This Saturday, Sunnyland Outdoor Furniture will be hosting their annual Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest in their parking lot.  Eggfest will consist of various local chefs participating in cooking demonstrations while utilizing the Big Green Egg Grill. Attendees will get the chance to vote for the best cooking demonstration at the conclusion of Eggfest. For more info on Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest, click here.

Best of Guide is a proud sponsor of Sunnyland Outdoor Furniture’s Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest

Four Seasons Markets at CityLine

Every Friday in June, CityLine in Richardson will be hosting a European-style market in the plaza. Patrons can purchase a variety of groceries, basic essentials, and various accessories from over 25 local vendors. For a full list of participating vendors, click here. 

Today kicks of the first of CityLine’s Four Seasons Market series. (Photo courtesy of CityLine Richardson)

Dirk Nowitzki’s 2018 Heroes Celebrity Baseball Game

Tonight, you can catch Dak Prescott, Mark Cuban, Ezekiel Elliot, and many more of your favorite local public figures playing a round of celebrity baseball. Opening pitch begins at 7:00 p.m. at Dr. Pepper Ballpark in Frisco. Proceeds from ticket sales benefit Dirk Nowitzki Foundation and the Heroes Foundation. To purchase tickets, click here.

Catch Dirk Nowitzki, along with various other local celebrities, at Dr. Pepper Ballpark tonight at 7:00 p.m. (Via ESPN)

Tough MUTTer

This Saturday, Mutt’s Canine Cantina will be hosting its first ever Tough MUTTer. Participating dogs will attempt to master an obstacle course for a chance to win a gift card from Mutts. Tickets are just $5 per competing dog, and all proceeds benefit the SPCA. To register for Tough MUTTer, click here.

 

The first ever Tough MUTTer takes place this Saturday (Via Trip Advisor)

Plano Comedy Festival

All weekend long, Plano will be hosting several comedians in the city’s inaugural comedy festival. In a mini-SXSW fashion, the likes of Aaron Aryanpur (Funniest Comic in Texas, FOX), Jonny Bratsveen (Comedy Central’s Hart of the City), and Mac Blake (Just For Laughs in Montreal) will be performing sets at Hyena’s Plano, Taste of the Islands, and Art Centre Theatre. For venue information, a full schedule of events, and tickets, click here. 

Aaron Aryanpur (Photo courtesy of Comedy Scene in Houston)

 

Sunnyland to host Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest this Saturday

This Saturday, Sunnyland Outdoor Furniture will be hosting their annual Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Eggfest in their parking lot. Dallas foodies will have the chance to celebrate their fathers eight days early.  Eggfest will consist of various local chefs participating in cooking demonstrations while utilizing the Big Green Egg Grill. Attendees will get the chance to vote for the best cooking demonstration at the conclusion of Eggfest.

This year’s vendors include VomFass, Deep Cuts, Dallas Caramel Company, and more.

The event is free to attend, however, it is suggested guests and participants make a donation of at least $1.00. Donations benefit Legacy Boxer Rescue.

Egg Fest officially kicks off at 11:00 a.m., with a cooking demo by Grady Spears, the official chef partner to the Houston Texans.

Grady Spears, Celebrity Chef Partner to the Houston Texans, will be showcasing a cooking demo at this year’s Dad’s Gift Grillin’ Egg Fest (Via Facebook)

 

Can’t make it to Eggfest? 105.3 The Fan will be airing a live broadcast from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. this Saturday. The broadcast can be live streamed here.

 

“Kitchen grease keeps you young,” Eric Dreyer of Fearing’s on growing within Dallas’s hospitality industry

On any given night at The Ritz-Carlton’s Fearing’s restaurant, you are bound to see one of Dallas’s most recognizable chefs. Eric Dreyer, Fearing’s Chef de Cuisine, has been working for Dean Fearing’s namesake since its opening in 2007. Since then, Dreyer has received numerous accolades, including Eater’s Dallas’s Hottest Chef award. Dreyer has also raised awareness for various charities and organizations, including the Young Texans Against Cancer. He is also vocal in his support for local farmers and artisans.

With all of these contributions and accolades to Dreyer’s credit, it is clear that he is truly meant to be working in this industry. However, Dreyer almost ended up working in a completely different field.

“I originally majored in computer science,” Dreyer says, “but I later came to realize that sitting at a desk all day wasn’t for me.”

Upon coming to this realization, Dreyer enrolled in the Southern California School of the Arts, a school which would later be bought out by the Cordon Bleu.  From there, he worked in various restaurants and catering companies until, following the advice of one of the chefs for whom he worked, he went to work for the Ritz-Carlton in Marina Del Rey.

“I worked in Jer-Ne at The Ritz-Carlton for about five years,” Dreyer says. “It was named LA’s best fusion restaurant in 2003.”

In between noting all of these time frames, he manages to put dates on himself, to which I reply commenting on Dreyer’s young appearance.

“Well thanks,” Dreyer chuckles in reply. “Kitchen grease keeps you young.”

He then explains how he ended up migrating to Texas from California.

“I went to a tasting at The Mansion at Turtle Creek, where Dean Fearing was working at the time,” Dreyer says. “I interviewed with Dean for the Sous Chef position, and was offered the job, but I didn’t end up taking it.”

Photo acquired via Facebook

Fearing ended up accepting an offer for a Chef de Cuisine position at Grand Hyatt DFW, where he later received the Grand Hyatt Rising Star Award.  He stayed with Grand Hyatt DFW for almost three years, until he learned that Ritz-Carlton was opening a hotel in Dallas.

“I heard Dean would be involved with the Ritz-Carlton’s restaurant, so I decided to interview with him,” Dreyer said. “Luckily, he remembered who I was, and I was offered the job.”

Since 2007, Dreyer has been a part of Dean Fearing’s carefully selected team.

“It’s never been stagnant here at Fearing’s,” Dreyer says. “There have been a lot of different things going on within the restaurant, so it’s managed to keep my interest throughout all of these years.”

Photo acquired via Facebook

Dreyer admits that throughout his time at Fearing’s, his and Fearing’s cooking styles have contrasted, however, he feels that he and Fearing make a great team.

“When I first started, it was very much simple, Asian inspired food,” Dreyer says. “With Dean, it’s very different. Dean has a lot of layers of flavor involved in his recipes. Sometimes you have what’s really simple, but there can be like 10 or 12 ingredients involved.  For me, I like clean, straightforward flavors, but I think our styles balance each other well.”

Dreyer posing with one of his signature items at A Night out for Phoenix (Photo Credit: Tammany Stern)

All accolades, awards, and achievements aside, Dreyer finds joy in the helping guests and colleagues take away the best experience possible.

“One of the best parts about my career is finding people that enjoy the whole experience; the people that come back regularly and converse and ask questions,” Dreyer says. “Seeing cooks that I trained, who had no initial restaurant experience, go on to run their own kitchens is also one of the best things.”

Guests of Fearing’s can always expect the royal treatment. Dreyer’s passion, attention to detail and commitment to top-notch guest service are what set him apart from other Dallas chefs. In Dreyer’s 43 years of life, he has lived out his kitchen dream to the fullest, and he has no plans to slow down anytime soon.